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N.S. Lung Association wants people to think twice about vaping and e-cigarettes

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control is investigating cases of coughing, shortness of breath and fatigue in 14 states, all believed to be linked to e-cigarettes
1704 vape sh Vaping file photo
Vaping involves the inhalation of chemical flavours and often nicotine added to a carrier liquid of propylene glycol and/or glycerol. While scientific research is still being conducted to determine the effects of the practice on one's oral health and hygiene, the Canadian Dental Association recommends that no one use the products in much the same way that it recommends not using tobacco or cannabis.

The Lung Association of Nova Scotia is urging users of vapes and e-cigarettes to think twice after a cluster of lung illnesses south of the border.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control is investigating cases of coughing, shortness of breath and fatigue in 14 states, all believed to be linked to e-cigarettes.

Association president Robert MacDonald tells NEWS 95.7 there have not been any reports of lung illnesses in the province.

But he adds no one knows the true affects these devices have on our bodies. 

"We want to have evidence-based decision making in our day-to-day operations here, and we want people to make evidence-based decisions on what they're doing and what they're putting into their body, and we just don't have that," MacDonald said. 

"It would be scary to be doing something that you don't know what the health effects could be, right?"

Almost half of Nova Scotia students in grade 10 through 12 have reported using an e-cigarette at least once.

Roughly 37 per cent of all students in grades 7 to 12 in this province report have tried an e-cigarette, well above the national average of 23 per cent.




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