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Drivers asked to be cautious as deer and moose look for love

The animals are more active at dusk and dawn increasing the risk of a crash during those times
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Deer crossing
(stock photo)

An organization that aims to reduce collisions with wildlife is reminding drivers to be extra cautious this time of year.

Watch for Wildlife says deer and moose are more bold in autumn and less apprehensive when it comes to crossing roads as they look for love.

"When deer and moose collisions spike is over the next month to month-and-a-half because it's mating season," said program manager Wanda Baxter. "They're actually moving more than they had been over the summer."

She told NEWS 95.7's The Sheldon MacLeod Show, driving the speed limit, scanning for movement or shining eyes on the sides of the road and not tailgating can increase safety.

"In order to give a warning to people behind you and on the other side, hit your hazard lights," she recommended. "People don't tend to think of it when they see large animals but if you do see one it's a good idea ... obviously if you have time and you're slowing down."

The animals are more active at dusk and dawn increasing the risk of a crash during those times.

Baxter said it's difficult to predict how you'll react when faced with a potential collision with wildlife, but there's one thing you should try to avoid doing.

"When something bolts, a last minute instinct could be swerving but absolutely what you don't want to do is swerve and lose control of your vehicle."

Bull moose are also known to be more aggressive during mating season, sometimes charging cars and people.

Signs of an aggressive moose include pinned back ears, hair raised on the neck, mouth smacking and licking, foot stomping, swaying head and short charges.

Parks Canada recently shut down the popular Skyline Trail in Cape Breton Highlands National Park due to "aggressive moose behaviour in the area."




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